extendingyourbrain

Stuff

fastcompany:

Careful listening, collaboration, asking good questions—these “soft skills” aren’t always taught in school.
Today’s college graduates need every skill-related edge they can get when it comes to applying for and landing a full-time job.
Numerous surveys and reports indicate that recent U.S. college graduates face a wildly competitive job market along with astronomical student loan debt. More than 40% of recent graduates are underemployed and 16% are working part-time jobs, according to Accenture’s 2013 College Graduate Employment Survey.
One employer survey, conducted by staffing company Adecco, indicates that 44% of responding companies cited “soft skills, such as communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration” as the area with “the biggest gap.”
Additionally, a Talent Shortage Survey from ManpowerGroup discovered that nearly one in five employers worldwide is unable to fill positions because they can’t find people with soft skills.
So what are these soft skills—and other critical workplace skills—that are necessary to join today’s collaborative, fast-moving, real-time workforce? Here are five:
Read More>

fastcompany:

Careful listening, collaboration, asking good questions—these “soft skills” aren’t always taught in school.

Today’s college graduates need every skill-related edge they can get when it comes to applying for and landing a full-time job.

Numerous surveys and reports indicate that recent U.S. college graduates face a wildly competitive job market along with astronomical student loan debt. More than 40% of recent graduates are underemployed and 16% are working part-time jobs, according to Accenture’s 2013 College Graduate Employment Survey.

One employer survey, conducted by staffing company Adecco, indicates that 44% of responding companies cited “soft skills, such as communication, critical thinking, creativity, and collaboration” as the area with “the biggest gap.”

Additionally, a Talent Shortage Survey from ManpowerGroup discovered that nearly one in five employers worldwide is unable to fill positions because they can’t find people with soft skills.

So what are these soft skills—and other critical workplace skills—that are necessary to join today’s collaborative, fast-moving, real-time workforce? Here are five:

Read More>

fastcompany:

We threw down the first “Habits Challenge” gauntlet today—check it out here—on wrangling your inbox using auto-replies. If you’re ready to crush the competition (the competition is yourself), this habit-tracking edition of Free App Friday is for you.
As always, while they’re free now, we can’t guarantee how long they’ll last—so don’t wait too long.
Read More>

fastcompany:

We threw down the first “Habits Challenge” gauntlet today—check it out here—on wrangling your inbox using auto-replies. If you’re ready to crush the competition (the competition is yourself), this habit-tracking edition of Free App Friday is for you.

As always, while they’re free now, we can’t guarantee how long they’ll last—so don’t wait too long.

Read More>

tattoolit:

This just describes me!
Done at Dark Arts in Warrington, England

tattoolit:

This just describes me!

Done at Dark Arts in Warrington, England

(via bookporn)

nomadmedstudent:

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.

  1. Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
  2. Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
  3. Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
  4. Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
  5. Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
  6. Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
  7. When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

General tips on how to keep them organized:

  • Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
  • Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
  • Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)

This is extremely awesome! You rock for posting this!

(via ourselvesimmortally)

nomadmedstudent:

mindofamedstudent:

Tutorial: how to make organized notes.

  1. Read the objectives of the lecture. If there aren’t any, flip through the lecture slides and make an outline. This puts into perspective what you need to be learning and what you should get out of this lecture.
  2. Skim the book to get familiar with how the information is divided compared to your outline or objectives. While doing this, you’ll figure out whether or not you need the extra details from the book. Sometimes the lecture is enough and you could keep the textbook just as a reference to things you don’t get.
  3. Write down the first objective and flip to the page in the book that has the information pertaining to that objective. Read the lecture slide then refer to the book for details.
  4. Combine your lecture notes with the textbook information. Do this by rewriting the information in your own words and try to be as concise as possible. 
  5. Keep doing this for every objective. Paste things if it helps.
  6. Make sure that you’re not just copying information. Use visual aids as much as possible. Put the information in a table, flowchart, diagram, etc.. (refer to this post to see how I make my flowcharts).
  7. When you’re done with all your objectives, go through the lecture and your notes to make sure you didn’t miss anything.

General tips on how to keep them organized:

  • Be systemic. Making objective-oriented notes is one way to do that. 
  • Use two (or more colors). Color-coding information helps me remember it + it doesn’t look that bad.
  • Section your objectives according to the topic. Then make sure that when you’re writing out the information, it’s in a sequence that’s understandable.

Disclaimer: this is the way I’ve been making my notes since I started med school. By no means am I claiming it’s perfect or that everybody should follow it.

Hope this helps and as always, happy studying :)

This is extremely awesome! You rock for posting this!

(via ourselvesimmortally)

hellofromtumblr:

The Perfect Theme?
Have a vision in your brain of an exactly perfect blog theme? Make it come true using your fingers!
Read the instructionsTake a class

hellofromtumblr:

The Perfect Theme?

Have a vision in your brain of an exactly perfect blog theme? Make it come true using your fingers!

Read the instructions
Take a class

notevendoommusic:

sizvideos:

Penn and Teller on Vaccinations - Video

Bill Nye once said, and I’m paraphrasing as I always do: If you must believe in creationism, at least keep it to yourself. Don’t raise your children to believe in that stuff. Let it end with you.

I like to think the parents against vaccination should ideally do the same thing. To think that they have no right to impose that on their children and do irreparable damage to not only those children, but to everyone those children impact.

But there’s the way it ought to be and there’s the way it is.

(via ourselvesimmortally)

jtotheizzoe:

skeptv:

Pixar: The math behind the movies

The folks at Pixar are widely known as some of the world’s best storytellers and animators. They are perhaps less recognized as some of the most innovative math whizzes around. Pixar Research Lead Tony DeRose delves into the math behind the animations, explaining how arithmetic, trigonometry and geometry help bring Woody and the rest of your favorite characters to life.

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/pixar-the-math-behind-the-movies-tony-derose

Talk by Tony DeRose.

via TED Education.

It’s not exactly shocking that computer animation would involve a lot of math, but it’s so cool to see exactly how they apply it. Don’t ever say math isn’t worth it. Remember: you wouldn’t have your precious Frozen without it.

How To Handle Criticism

psych-quotes:

How To Handle Criticism

Let’s face it, criticism is hard to hear. No matter how true or constructive it might be, it hurts. Here’s how to make the most of it and handle it like a pro:

  • Put it in perspective. No matter how many compliments we receive, we tend to dwell on the one or two negative…

http://reconcorps-es.tumblr.com/post/84365785356/how-to-take-standardized-tests-wow-okay-so-a

reconcorps-es:

how to take standardized tests

wow okay so!! a very close friend of mine has a standardized test coming up soon, inspiring me to compile some resources for taking standardized tests (or maybe just tests in general)

standardized tests/multiple choice tests - general

before you study for…

(Source: solarfae)